How-To: Install Whiteline Front/Rear Sway Bars and Endlinks on 2008+ Mitsubishi EVO X

You can purchase these sway bars and endlinks directly from us by clicking below:

Whiteline Heavy Duty Front Sway Bar 27mm Adjustable Mitsubishi EVO X 2008-2014

Whiteline Heavy Duty Rear Sway Bar 27mm Adjustable Mitsubishi EVO X 2008-2014

Whiteline Adjustable Ball Socket Front Or Rear Endlinks Subaru Models (inc. 2002-2014 WRX / STI) / EVO 8/9/X

Whiteline Adjustable Ball Socket Endlinks Rear Mitsubishi EVO X 2008-2014

n this how-to, we will be installing the Whiteline heavy duty front and rear sway bars and the adjustable end links. There has been a lot of interest and questions regarding the install of the front sway bar specifically, more so than the rear, as the rear is fairly simple and straight forward. I don’t want to give off the wrong impression, while the front was definitely much more difficult and involved than the rear, all in all, it wasn’t as terrible as I was prepared for.

Getting started, the first thing we needed to do was collect the necessary tools to perform this task. There wasn’t any special tools needed, other than the transmission jack we used to drop the sub-frame, but if you were to attempt this on the ground, you could use a floor jack to do the same thing. I could definitely see it being possible while having the car on the ground, although it would be a lot harder, fortunately, we have a lift.

So, let’s get a list of tools you will need.

1) Ratchets (we used both a ½ drive and a 3/8 drive ratchet
2) Sockets: 10mm, 12mm, 13mm, 14mm, 17mm, 19mm
3) Long extension (or a combination of shorter extensions)
4) 5mm allen wrench (to hold the end link stud)
5) Flat tip screwdriver
6) Transmission stand (or a floor jack if you’re on the ground)
7) Jack, or car lift
8) Jack stands (if on the floor)

Now, we have all of our tools, should we get started on this fun filled project? I think so. We will need to remove the parts outlined in the image below. You won’t have to remove the entire under tray, just these parts to gain access to the bolts and clips and other miscellaneous things involved in this install.

There are a few 10mm bolts holding these but mostly there are plastic clips that require either a flat tip screwdriver like the one pictured below, or a Phillips screwdriver that you just back out a half turn.

Now we can undo the three 17mm bolts (two up front, one in the rear) and the two 12mm bolts on either side of the brace.

Next, pull the 14mm bolt/nut out of the front engine mount (be careful when pulling this out as the whole brace will now fall out)

Onto the rear brace now, all it takes is 2 14mm bolts and 2 12mm bolts and it comes right out.

We need to unbolt the two straps that hold the power steering lines to the sub frame by removing the two 10mm bolts. They are on top of the rack in the rear so they are a little hard to see, but I outlined them here.

Now we need to remove the three 17mm bolts that go through the steering rack, in order to get to one of these bolts, we need to remove the rear motor mount. It takes 1 bolt/nut that goes through the mount, then three more 14mm bolts that go through the sub frame (two on the rear, one on the front) After you get these loose, you can move the mount over to the right (or the left if you prefer) so you can get to the third steering rack bolt.

The end links need to be removed from the factory mounts. Now these little guys fought us a little bit, we ended up having to hold the stud with the 5mm allen wrench while loosening the nut with our 14mm ratcheting wrench.

We can take the bolts off of the sway bar bushing retainers now. So just take the 4 12mm bolts out and it should come loose. There is one on the back side that you just can’t see here in this image, but it’s there. Take them all out, both passenger and drivers side.

The three bolts holding the steering rack can come out now. There is one to the driver’s side and two almost directly across from each other on the passenger side. Take your 17mm ratchet and socket to take what you can out, and then you might have to use a wrench on others like we did.

Take the three bolts out of the rear brace and put it aside

Next we can take the sub frame bolts out. There are 4 19mm bolts holding the sub frame up. There are two in the rear, right be where you just took the rear braces off.

There is a hole in the lower control arm that you’ll have to grab either a long extension to get to the bolt, or stack shorter extensions like we did here. Pull all four of the bolts out making sure to have your tranny jack, or regular jack (depending if you’re on the ground or in the air) to support the sub frame before dropping it.

Finally, we can drop the sub frame!! You can see in this picture just how much more room you will have to work with getting the sway bar out after you drop the sub frame.

We can take the sway bar out now. Try to keep track of how you pull it out, you have to wiggle it around a little bit to get it to come, but it will come out without too much effort.

Here’s the stock sway vs. the Whiteline part. It’s a good idea to keep these by each other as you install the bushings to get close to the mounting locations.

We can install our end links now. We opted for the White line units; you can use the factory end links as well. There are three holes in the sway bar; you can choose whatever setting you like. We went with the middle setting for now. The furthest out is the softest setting, the middle is the medium and the closest in is the most rigid setting. This is something you will want to experiment with to find out which one is the best for your personal situation. Don’t forget to install the washer supplied with your Whiteline end links.

Bushings are next. These are very simple to install, the main thing to remember is to try to line them up as much as possible with your eye so they will line up with the bolt holes in the sub frame. The Whiteline sway bars come with grease packs.

Use about half the pack of grease per side and spread it around the inside of the bushing and spread it open over the sway bar. Now place the retainer over the bushings now it’s ready to throw on the car.

Slide it back up into the car, over the stock bolt holes.

Thread in the bolts to hold the sway in place, don’t tighten them up yet, we will need to adjust it from side to side to make sure the end links line up properly.

Now, bolt everything back up in the reverse order of the removal and you’re good to go and we can move onto the rear. We can start with the end links. Same as the front, we had to use the 5mm allen wrench to hold the stud while wrenching the nut off.

After you get those loose, take your 12mm and undo the bushing retainers, its 4 bolts (2 on each side) and it should be loose and ready to come off.

Here is the factory sway vs. the Whiteline bar. Again, it’s a good idea to keep these by each other as you put the bushings and straps on to line them up with the stock ones.

Grease your bushings and slip them on, compare them to stock position, get them close, doesn’t have to be perfect, we can always adjust them when we install the bar.

So, when you bolt it up, leave it loose while you adjust the bar’s position left to right so the end links line up.

Installing the end links is very simple and straight forward, make sure they are adjusted where you want them prior to installing; we opted to keep them about stock length. Slide them in the holes and bolt it up.

The rear sway bar from Whiteline comes with a pair of lateral locks. Now that we have the bar adjusted where we want it, let’s go ahead and install the lateral locks to keep it in place. They are a simple 2 piece “clamp” style lock. Take the bolts out, place it tight against the inside of the respective side of the sway bar, then place the other side on, thread the bolts on and tighten them down.

We went with the middle setting on the rear as well. We wanted to set the car up as balanced as we could to get some baseline runs in and see if we want to adjust them later.

That’s it! It was a little bit of a chore of course, as you would expect installing something that is so important to the handling and suspension of your car. We are going to take the car out for some runs and get some hard data and share it as soon as it is done. Thanks for taking time to read this long write up and we hope it helps you guys make the decision to purchase some aftermarket sway bars. Don’t let the install scare you. They are reasonably difficult, but definitely do-able. Thanks for reading!!

-Corby

How-To: Install Whiteline Front and Rear Control Arm Bushings on 2003+ Mitsubishi EVO 8/9/X

You can purchase these bushings directly from us HERE

In this how-to, we will be installing the Whiteline control arm bushings, on the front and the rear. The ones on the front were a lot easier than the rear. But they were both relatively easy, just time consuming.
Getting started, the first thing we needed to do was collect the necessary tools to perform this task. There was one special tool we needed for this install and it was the press tool kit. So, let’s get a list of tools you will need.

1) Ratchet
2) Sockets: 14mm, 17mm, 19mm
3) Wrenches 14mm, 17mm, 19mm
4) Jack, or car lift
5) Jack stands (if on the floor)

Now, we have all of our tools, should we get started on this fun filled project? I think so. We will need to remove the parts outlined in the image below; the front section can be left on the car for this install. You won’t have to remove the entire under tray, just these parts to gain access to the bolts and nuts.

There are a few 10mm bolts holding these but mostly there are plastic clips that require either a flat tip screwdriv

Now we can get to the bolts that hold the lower control arm in place. You will have one in the rear position it bolts straight up into the chassis and it’s a 19mm there is a nut on the other end of it and you’ll have to put a 19mm wrench on there to keep it from spinning. You can take it all the way out.

Next there is one in the front of the car, It’s also a 19 mm and you’ll have to pull the plastic cover out of the way to gain access to it. Simple enough, once you get to it, just zip it out and take it out of the car.

Take the bolt/nut out of the spindle to lower control arm. It’s a 17mm bolt with a nut on the back side, get your wrench on the back side before you loosen it. Then just pull it right out.

Take the bolt out of the end link and the LCA should be ready to pull out. You might have to wiggle it back and forth just a little bit, but it should pull out with little effort.

In order for us to get the existing bushings out we will need a ball joint press tool kit. We went down to the local AutoZone and bought this kit from them. It is available as a “tool to rent” if you just needed to use it this once and bring it back. If you do that you get your 100 bucks back

With the arm off the vehicle, we can remove the stock bushings. We need to get the rubber washers off the

We just need to separate them with the #2 press adaptor. It’s a little tricky to get in there because of the shape of the arm itself. It’s doable, just tricky. We used an air impact to drive the press shaft into the bushing to push it out of the arm like this

Once we have the old bushings out, we can slide the new ones in, first; however, we need to throw some grease in the bushing to avoid abnormal wear on the bushing.

Since they are greased up, we can slide them in place; they should fit tight, but go in with a little bit of effort.

This being a two piece bushing you will have to put once half in one side and the other half on the other side.

Now we slide the sleeve in through the whole assembly. You can do this by hand, be sure to push it all the way through.

While putting the arm in, you will want to slip the rear of the arm in first, then you can push the front part we just replaced the bushing in

Now we can reinstall the arm. Word of caution; make sure you get the cut out on the stud lined up with the hole so you don’t destroy your bolt as you slide it in.

Push the arm up and slide the stud back in place and throw your bolt through (it should slide in easily) Then thread your nut on and tighten it down.

Put your end link back on and thread the nut on and tighten it down.

Ok, so that’s it for the fronts, let’s move on to the rear. The rears are a little more difficult considering their location. They are up top on the forward part of the upper control arm. Here’s a picture of the bushings we will be replacing.

To get to these bushings, we will need to remove the upper control arm. To do this, we ultimately need to remove these three bolts.

Take the 17mm bolt/nut off the spindle to control arm. There is a nut and a bolt here so you will have to use a wrench and a ratchet with socket.

Next pull the rear most 19mm bolt out from just in front of the rear sway bar.

Now the award winning tough to get to bolt! This one took the most time out of all of the bolts in this install. The proximity of the bolt to the fuel lines, fuel tank, and basically everything else you can think of made this pretty difficult to get out. We ended up having to run a very long extension up from the front of the car to the head of the bolt.

This is the angle we took to get to the bolt; this is looking back from just in front of the driver’s side wheel well behind the fuel tank. It’s tricky, but doable. Be patient.

Then pull the end link from the sway bar.

To make room for the control arm to slide out, we had to loosen the coil over and pull it out of its slot and slide it out of the way.

Now that we have the arm out of the car, let’s bring it over to the work bench and get that bushing out We’ll have to pull the same rubber washer/spacers out as we did on the fronts

These bushings pushed out nice and easy. Just use the #2 press tool and the c-clamp and press it right out.

Then we replace these bushing just like the fronts (don’t forget to grease the sleeve)

And slide the metal sleeve in

Now we can put everything back together and call this thing DONE!!
Slide the arm in place and bolt it right back up then reassemble all of it. It seemed to help to have a jack on the brake assembly to help hold it in place while we slid it into the spindle up top.

Then reassemble the strut assembly.

When we get all of this stuff together, we can stand back and look at how much we have accomplished!

Here’s the assembly all back together and ready for some track time!

It’s time to celebrate all of our hard work and take our evo out to the nearest track and test these new parts! We will have updates on the performance enhancements of these parts soon, with a video or two, keep an eye on these threads! Thanks for reading our write ups and we hope they all help you guys when you install your own items.

-Corby

How-To: Install Whiteline Roll Center Kit on 2003+ Mitsubishi EVO 8/9/X

You can purchase this roll center kit directly from us HERE

In this how-to, we will be installing the Whiteline front roll center kit. I had done this once before on a 2013 Subaru BRZ so I was somewhat prepared for what to expect.
This install is pretty easy, and straight forward, it does take a special tool, a ball joint press kit.

Getting started, the first thing we needed to do was collect the necessary tools to perform this task. So, let’s get a list of tools you will need.

1) Ratchet
2) Sockets: 14mm, 17mm, 19mm
3) Wrenches 14mm, 17mm, 19mm
4) Jack, or car lift
5) Jack stands (if on the floor)

Now, we have all of our tools, should we get started on this fun filled project? I think so. We will need to remove the parts outlined in the image below; the front section can be left on the car for this install. You won’t have to remove the entire under tray, just these parts to gain access to the bolts and nuts.

There are a few 10mm bolts holding these but mostly there are plastic clips that require either a flat tip screwdriver like the one pictured below, or a Phillips screwdriver that you just back out a half turn.

Here’s a shot of what comes in the kit when you pull it out of the package:

Now we can get to the bolts that hold the lower control arm in place. You will have one in the rear position it bolts straight up into the chassis and it’s a 19mm there is a nut on the other end of it and you’ll have to put a 19mm wrench on there to keep it from spinning. You can take it all the way out.

Next there is one in the front of the car, It’s also a 19 mm and you’ll have to pull the plastic cover out of the way to gain access to it. Simple enough, once you get to it, just zip it out and take it out of the car.

Take the bolt/nut out of the spindle to lower control arm. It’s a 17mm bolt with a nut on the back side, get your wrench on the back side before you loosen it. Then just pull it right out.

Take the bolt out of the end link and the LCA should be ready to pull out. You might have to wiggle it back and forth just a little bit, but it should pull out with little effort.

Since we have the LCA out, we can quickly throw the tie rod end on. As you loosen the lock nut on the factory tie rod end make sure you mark where the factory tie rod end was threaded to.

Thread the stock one off, then, thread the new Whiteline tie rod end in its place and tighten the lock nut down and push it up through the spindle and throw the nut on.

To get the stock ball joints out, you will have to press them out, either with a hydraulic press, or with a kit like we bought from AutoZone, here’s a picture with the part number of the kit we bought. This kit was 100 bucks, it might not have a ton of options in it, but it worked perfectly for this install.

First thing we did was get the stock black dust cover off of the ball joint. It was easy enough, all you have to do is get a flat tip screwdriver under the lip and pry it up and then pull it off. Careful there is a LOT of grease under there (thankfully) Once you get the cover off, you will want to clean the grease up and get access to the flat snap ring that holds the ball joint in place. These things are a little tricky to pull off. The best way I found to get it off was to take some snap ring pliers to spread them open just a little bit, and then slide a flat tip screwdriver under there to pry it off. Be patient it will come off. Don’t worry about destroying it; you’re replacing the whole thing anyway.

Here’s the tool we used to press the stock one out. It came out relatively easily, after it broke the initial hold on the ball joint, it came right out.

When pressing in the new Whiteline ball joint, you want to make sure it’s fully seated in the sleeve. It has to go in there quite a ways, you can see in this picture how far it has to go in. if you don’t get it fully seated, you will never get the snap ring on.

Once you get it fully seated, you have to put the dust cover on. Easiest way we found to get it on all the way was to take the #3 press tool and tap it on with a hammer, make sure you get it fully seated.

Now we can reinstall the arm. Word of caution; make sure you get the cut out on the stud lined up with the hole so you don’t destroy your bolt as you slide it in.

Push the arm up and slide the stud back in place and throw your bolt through (it should slide in easily) Then thread your nut on and tighten it down.

Put your end link back on and thread the nut on and tighten it down.

That’s it! Here’s a shot of the tie rod end with the ball joint in the background, looks good!

This install didn’t take that long at all. Here’s a little blurb about the kit “Roll Center Kit incorporates 2 steering arm tie rod ends and 2 ball joints and is designed to raise front roll-center geometry after lowering the vehicle and also improve on the original bump-steer geometry. Changing front suspension geometry by raising roll-center, results in substantial increase to roll resistance and significant reduction of suspension compression of outside front wheel during cornering through improved weight transfer distribution. Whilst bump steer correction via extended tie rods aids in minimizing steering angle input during suspension articulation. “

Thanks for reading this write up we hope it helps assist you in the installation of your own roll center kit!

-Corby

How-To: Install Ohlins Coilovers on a 2008+ Mitsubishi EVO X

You can purchase these Coilovers directly from us HERE


Installation Difficulty 2.5 out of 5

Installation Time (about 1 -1.5 hours)

Tools Needed:
-Flat Head Screwdriver
-6mm and 5mm Allen Wrench
-12mm Wrench or Socket
-14mm Wrench and Socket
-17mm Wrench and Socket
-19mm Wrench and Socket

Ohlins Packaging

Everything you will receive in your packages

Got to Love that Gold on the Ohlins 

Before we installed the the coilovers they needed to be assembled.

Assembly was pretty straight forward just make sure you install your 10k front springs on the Front Struts and 7k Rear Springs on the Rear 

Front 10k Springs Part #47010-31/100C 022

Rear 7k Springs Part # 47010-19/70C 022

Installation:

-Remove your wheels and tires to give you all the room you need to remove your stock suspension and install your newcoilovers.

If you have a lift before raising the car up you will want to loosen the 3 – 14mm nuts on top of your front Struts on each side.

From Down below on the back side of the front struts there will be a 12mm nut holding the brake line and sensor wire bracket.

Removing this nut will allow you to remove the bracket with lines from the original struts.

Using a 19mm Open end wrench and 19mm Socket remove the 2 nut and bolts on the bottom of the Front Strut Assemblies.

Once these have been removed you can loosen the top 3 -14mm nuts to remove the old strut. Re-installing will be in the reverse order 

60k miles with winter driving has started to show its use on the stock suspension.

Front Suspension Torque specs are as follows:

For the 3 -14mm nuts on top of the strut assembly 33 +- 3 Ft-Lb.

For the 2 -19mm Nuts and bolts on the Bottom of the struts assembly 81 +/- 8 ft-lb .

To start on the Rear Assembly you will need a Flat Head screwdriver to to remove the interior plastic.

Start by removing the trunk carpet.

Your will next step will be to remove the clips that hold the plastic cover over the Battery and Washer resistor.

2 Clips on top

And two Clips on each side

Once all 4 clips have been removed pull the plastic cover down and out

Next Step will be to remove both side carpets.

There are two clips on both sides that hold the carpet in now.

These are threaded clips so simply twist to the left to loosen and pull off.

You will now have access to the top 2 -14mm nuts that hold the top strut assembly to the chassis.

With your 14mm Socket loosen both nuts on top of the strut.

The one on the back side is a little tricky to get to and undo as you do not have that much room but its not too bad 

A view of both nuts from inside.

Once both of these have been loosened you can now work on the lower side.

Using a 17mm socket and wrench you can loosen and remove the lower bolt that holds the Strut and Lower control arm in place.

With the lower bolt removed you can now remove the top 2 -14mm nuts and remove the rear strut assembly to install your New Ohlins 

Install in the reverse order.

Rear Suspension Torque Specs are as follows:

For the 2 -14mm nuts on the top of the strut assembly 33 +- 3 Ft-Lbs.

For the 1 – 17mm Nut and Bolt on the bottom of the assembly 52 +/- 7 ft-lb.

A nice part that Ohlins has included with these coilovers is the remote adjusters for Damping/ Rebound for the rear.

There is one for each side in the rear.

This will allow you to easily adjust your damping and rebound with the turn of a knob with out having to remove the trunk interior.

This hole in the rear of the chassis I found to be a great location spot to have adjuster knob sitting that will not be covered once all the trunk interior parts are back in.

I fished the end that goes into the top of the strut assembly like shown in the picture below.

This will connect into the top of the strut like shown below.

Using the provided Allen tool you can tighten the little Allen screw to hold the remote adjuster in place.

Installed remote adjuster 

Reinstall your trunk interior and you will now be able to easily access the adjustment knobs 

When you are all done reinstall your wheels and Make sure to torque your lug nuts before trying out your new suspension 

To adjust your Damping/ Rebound on the front struts locate the little knob on the bottom of the Ohlins strut assembly.

Left to soften Right to stiffen.

Same with the rears, but you will have easy access with the provided adjuster knobs.

Before Ohlins installed 

After Ohlins installed 

Some cool Professional installed pictures of the Ohlins to show off 

Last is a pretty cool cut away shot our company photographer did 

If you have any questions or concerns on how to install please feel free to let us know.

Thank you,

Dallin

How-To: Install Turboback Exhaust on 2008+ Mitsubishi Evolution X

You can purchase this Turboback exhaust directly form us HERE

Tools Needed

PB Blast (for those old rusty bolts)
Ratchet
Extension
10mm socket
12mm socket
14mm socket
17mm socket
14mm wrench
17mm wrench
O2 Socket
Pliers
And something to trim plastic with

Lets start with Tomei Expreme Downpipe Big Mouth 

What is included

Two Part Down Pipe
Exhaust Clamp
New Turbo to Downpipe Gasket
Extra O2 Bung Plug with Copper Washer
2 New Nuts (For the Cat to Downpipe bolts)
New Stud
Tomei’s Bolt-Smooth-Paste

Great quality welds that look good. You know you are getting a quality piece with this 

The First Step we did before getting under the car was to remove the Heat shield  that is bolted onto the Manifold and Down Pipe

Start by removing the plastic cover the covers your engine.

To remove simply pull up on it gently with one hand on the back and front.

It is held on by 4 rubber mounts that are on the engine

Remove your Strut Tower Brace as well to give you more room to work with.

You will need a 14mm socket or wrench for the 6 nuts and 2 bolts that hold this on.

3- 14mm nuts Located at the top of each strut

2-14mm bolts in the center mounted to the cowl/ firewall

You will now have much better access to the heat shield located on the back of the motor.

Locate the 5- 10mm bolts that hold the heat shield to the manifold and down pipe.

3- 10mm bolts located on top of the heat shield mounted to the manifold

2- 10mm bolts located on the lower back and side to the down pipe.

Once you have removed the heat shield you will now be able to see the down pipe.

There are 5 bolts and 1 Nut all being 14mm size.

(I recommend PB Blasting these bolts to help break them loose with out breaking)

(Our down pipe bracket bolt was already broken off and is still in the down pipe.)

Next We lifted our car up to work on the underside while the Turbo to Down Pope bolts soak in PB Blast 

Using a O2 censor socket we removed the the O2 Sensor and Wide band sensor in the exhaust.

We removed the Cat section next

There are 2- 17mm bolts on each end of the cat section 4 total.

Use a 12mm socket to remove the bolt that holds the exhaust to the hanger.

This is much easier than removing the hanger with the exhaust on it.

Removal of the lower part of the down pipe will require a 17mm socket or wrench.

An extension will be needed if using a socket or some maneuvering of your arm to get a wrench onto the two 17mm spring bolts that are holding the lower portion of the down pipe up.

Once you have removed the lower half of the down pipe you will now have more access to the turbo for getting the mouth of the down pipe off.

Using a 14mm socket and ratchet carefully remove the 4 bolts holding the down pipe to the turbo.
(Use PB Blast while backing out the bolts to help them come out while you back them out)
Do not forget the 1 14mm nut on the bottom back side of the housing. Its hard to see from up top, but its on the lower back side and can get to it from the bottom.

Once you undo all of the bolts you will need to pull this portion of the down pipe out through the top of the motor.

A comparison of the Stock Down Pipe vs. the Tomei

Tomei’s bigger diameter and smother design

Big Mouth Opening

I like that they surface the flange face smooth for a nice even flat surface for the gasket

Using the provided Tomei Bolt-Smooth-Paste apply this to new stud provided with the new Tomei Down Pipe.

A little bit on the threads is all that is needed.

Spread this evenly over the threads and do this for all the studs and bolts. This will make life easier down the road if needed to remove in the future.

Install the lower stud into the down pipe. This will help guide the down pipe onto the turbo and hold the new provided gasket in place.

Use two nuts installed on the stud like show below to tighten the stud into the down pipe.

Always consult the installation instructions provide for questions 

Slide the the two parts of the down pipe together with the provided clamp on.

(Note you will want to snug up the clamp, but do not fully tighten yet. You will want to still be able to rotate it as need to line up with the rest of the exhaust.)

Tomei has thought ahead for you and made their down pipe with a 2nd O2 bung for those running a AFR sensor on their cars.

If your car is not running a AFR sensor no worries. Tomei has provided you with a extra bung plug.

This would be the time to install this plug before putting the down pipe in the car.

Install your new gasket that has been provided and be ready to install your new Tomei Down Pipe.

See how this is the incorrect way to try and install your down pipe as it is simply much to big to fit.

Install the new Tomei down pipe from the top of the engine bay.

Set it gently into place to rest safely while you lift the car to gain access to the bottom of the car to align the down pipe with your turbo.

From below you can now align the down pipe properly.

Reaching in from the wheel well can help you align and hold the down pipe in place while the bolts are all installed.

(Placing a little Tomei Bolt-Smooth-Paste on all bolts before installing as well)

From down here you can install the nut that goes on the stud that is not easy to get to from the wheel well.

You can now align the lower portion of the down pipe and instal your O2 and ARF Sensor.

Tighten all of your bolts once everything is aligned.

With your Cat removed and down pipe installed removal of your cat back exhaust will be simple.

This exhaust system has seen better days.

You will need a 17mm socket and ratchet and some PB Blast to remove the spring bolts and slide the hangers off the exhaust.

The Cat Back is made up of 2 parts. The Mid Pipe and the Muffler section.

Having an extra hand to lower the exhaust after removing the hangers will help. (Use a little PB Blast on the metal hangers will help to slip the rubber exhaust hangers off)

Now that the stock exhaust has been removed you will be ready for your Tomei Test pipe and cat back install.
(Recommend wearing gloves when installing the Titanium exhaust to not leave finger prints on the exhaust)

Lets start with the Test pipe section.

Included will be the test pipe with a place for your factory O2 sensor
4 new nuts
4 new bolts
2 new gaskets
Bolt-Smooth Paste
and a zip tie for your O2 sensor wiring to be tied back up

Save over 12 lbs!!! from the stock Cat! 

Stock Cat 14.7 lbs. vs. Tomei’s Test Pipe 2.4 lbs!

Take your new hardware and apply some Bolt-Smooth-Paste to them.

Slide them onto your down pipe and install new gasket that is provided.

Install the test pipe and mount the bolts that are provided.

What it looks like once installed 

It is now time for the main event!

Tomei Titanium cat back install. This extremely light weight and a work of art!

Included will be the 3 part cat back system
A Silencer for those that would like it quieter
1 New Gasket
2 Exhaust Clamps
4 Retainer Springs
2 New Bolts
1 Light Weight Muffler Hanger
1 Rubber Gard for the Muffler to Muffler Hanger
1 Nut and Bolt (Used for clamping the Muffler Hanger to the Muffler)
1 Bolt-Smooth-Paste

This system really is extremely light weight!

You will save over 34 lbs form your stock cat back with the Tomei Titanium Exhaust.

Stock 44.2 lbs vs. Tomei 9.7 lbs!!!

Bolt your first straight pipe of your cat back up to your test pipe

Slide your middle section onto the end of the straight pipe lining up the spring retainer hooks.
(Note have your exhaust clamp on before connecting these two sections together) 

Once the two pre-muffler pipes are connected we hook the exhaust on the first hanger under the rear diff section.

Once the two pre-muffler pipes are connected we hook the exhaust on the first hanger under the rear diff section.

Your two pipes should look like so once installed.

We snugged up our exhaust clamps and had the bolt on the top of the exhaust as to not hang down low.
They could get caught or rub if your car is low.
(Do not tighten up as some adjustment will be needed later)

Install your retainer springs once your clamp is snug.

You may use pliers for pulling this enough to hook.
(This can be a little tricky be careful)

Once your retainer springs are installed it should look like so.

For the Muffler section we installed the muffler hanger and hanger before the muffler.
(Make sure to use the protective rubber strip between the muffler and the muffler hanger when installing)

Slide the muffler through the hanger and line up the muffler to the middle section of the cat back system.

(Having an extra hand when sliding the muffler into place will help out at this point and make sure you have your exhaust clamp already on)

Once you have the muffler in place and aligned up snug up your exhaust clamp and attach your retainer springs.

It is now time to tighten up all your clamps.

With the exhaust being installed you may notice that the exhaust tip has a slight angle that makes it come close to thebumper plastic.
(As seen in this picture of the plastic touching the muffler)

Using something to cut the plastic with carefully trim away what is needed to provide more clearance of the bumper to muffler.
(We used some wire cutters to take care of this although anything can be used that will cut the plastic)

Bumper now has now been trimmed to fit with the muffler with plenty of clearance.

And now the final result!

Thank You,

Dallin