How-To: Install Whiteline Front/Rear Sway Bars and Endlinks on 2008+ Mitsubishi EVO X

You can purchase these sway bars and endlinks directly from us by clicking below:

Whiteline Heavy Duty Front Sway Bar 27mm Adjustable Mitsubishi EVO X 2008-2014

Whiteline Heavy Duty Rear Sway Bar 27mm Adjustable Mitsubishi EVO X 2008-2014

Whiteline Adjustable Ball Socket Front Or Rear Endlinks Subaru Models (inc. 2002-2014 WRX / STI) / EVO 8/9/X

Whiteline Adjustable Ball Socket Endlinks Rear Mitsubishi EVO X 2008-2014

n this how-to, we will be installing the Whiteline heavy duty front and rear sway bars and the adjustable end links. There has been a lot of interest and questions regarding the install of the front sway bar specifically, more so than the rear, as the rear is fairly simple and straight forward. I don’t want to give off the wrong impression, while the front was definitely much more difficult and involved than the rear, all in all, it wasn’t as terrible as I was prepared for.

Getting started, the first thing we needed to do was collect the necessary tools to perform this task. There wasn’t any special tools needed, other than the transmission jack we used to drop the sub-frame, but if you were to attempt this on the ground, you could use a floor jack to do the same thing. I could definitely see it being possible while having the car on the ground, although it would be a lot harder, fortunately, we have a lift.

So, let’s get a list of tools you will need.

1) Ratchets (we used both a ½ drive and a 3/8 drive ratchet
2) Sockets: 10mm, 12mm, 13mm, 14mm, 17mm, 19mm
3) Long extension (or a combination of shorter extensions)
4) 5mm allen wrench (to hold the end link stud)
5) Flat tip screwdriver
6) Transmission stand (or a floor jack if you’re on the ground)
7) Jack, or car lift
8) Jack stands (if on the floor)

Now, we have all of our tools, should we get started on this fun filled project? I think so. We will need to remove the parts outlined in the image below. You won’t have to remove the entire under tray, just these parts to gain access to the bolts and clips and other miscellaneous things involved in this install.

There are a few 10mm bolts holding these but mostly there are plastic clips that require either a flat tip screwdriver like the one pictured below, or a Phillips screwdriver that you just back out a half turn.

Now we can undo the three 17mm bolts (two up front, one in the rear) and the two 12mm bolts on either side of the brace.

Next, pull the 14mm bolt/nut out of the front engine mount (be careful when pulling this out as the whole brace will now fall out)

Onto the rear brace now, all it takes is 2 14mm bolts and 2 12mm bolts and it comes right out.

We need to unbolt the two straps that hold the power steering lines to the sub frame by removing the two 10mm bolts. They are on top of the rack in the rear so they are a little hard to see, but I outlined them here.

Now we need to remove the three 17mm bolts that go through the steering rack, in order to get to one of these bolts, we need to remove the rear motor mount. It takes 1 bolt/nut that goes through the mount, then three more 14mm bolts that go through the sub frame (two on the rear, one on the front) After you get these loose, you can move the mount over to the right (or the left if you prefer) so you can get to the third steering rack bolt.

The end links need to be removed from the factory mounts. Now these little guys fought us a little bit, we ended up having to hold the stud with the 5mm allen wrench while loosening the nut with our 14mm ratcheting wrench.

We can take the bolts off of the sway bar bushing retainers now. So just take the 4 12mm bolts out and it should come loose. There is one on the back side that you just can’t see here in this image, but it’s there. Take them all out, both passenger and drivers side.

The three bolts holding the steering rack can come out now. There is one to the driver’s side and two almost directly across from each other on the passenger side. Take your 17mm ratchet and socket to take what you can out, and then you might have to use a wrench on others like we did.

Take the three bolts out of the rear brace and put it aside

Next we can take the sub frame bolts out. There are 4 19mm bolts holding the sub frame up. There are two in the rear, right be where you just took the rear braces off.

There is a hole in the lower control arm that you’ll have to grab either a long extension to get to the bolt, or stack shorter extensions like we did here. Pull all four of the bolts out making sure to have your tranny jack, or regular jack (depending if you’re on the ground or in the air) to support the sub frame before dropping it.

Finally, we can drop the sub frame!! You can see in this picture just how much more room you will have to work with getting the sway bar out after you drop the sub frame.

We can take the sway bar out now. Try to keep track of how you pull it out, you have to wiggle it around a little bit to get it to come, but it will come out without too much effort.

Here’s the stock sway vs. the Whiteline part. It’s a good idea to keep these by each other as you install the bushings to get close to the mounting locations.

We can install our end links now. We opted for the White line units; you can use the factory end links as well. There are three holes in the sway bar; you can choose whatever setting you like. We went with the middle setting for now. The furthest out is the softest setting, the middle is the medium and the closest in is the most rigid setting. This is something you will want to experiment with to find out which one is the best for your personal situation. Don’t forget to install the washer supplied with your Whiteline end links.

Bushings are next. These are very simple to install, the main thing to remember is to try to line them up as much as possible with your eye so they will line up with the bolt holes in the sub frame. The Whiteline sway bars come with grease packs.

Use about half the pack of grease per side and spread it around the inside of the bushing and spread it open over the sway bar. Now place the retainer over the bushings now it’s ready to throw on the car.

Slide it back up into the car, over the stock bolt holes.

Thread in the bolts to hold the sway in place, don’t tighten them up yet, we will need to adjust it from side to side to make sure the end links line up properly.

Now, bolt everything back up in the reverse order of the removal and you’re good to go and we can move onto the rear. We can start with the end links. Same as the front, we had to use the 5mm allen wrench to hold the stud while wrenching the nut off.

After you get those loose, take your 12mm and undo the bushing retainers, its 4 bolts (2 on each side) and it should be loose and ready to come off.

Here is the factory sway vs. the Whiteline bar. Again, it’s a good idea to keep these by each other as you put the bushings and straps on to line them up with the stock ones.

Grease your bushings and slip them on, compare them to stock position, get them close, doesn’t have to be perfect, we can always adjust them when we install the bar.

So, when you bolt it up, leave it loose while you adjust the bar’s position left to right so the end links line up.

Installing the end links is very simple and straight forward, make sure they are adjusted where you want them prior to installing; we opted to keep them about stock length. Slide them in the holes and bolt it up.

The rear sway bar from Whiteline comes with a pair of lateral locks. Now that we have the bar adjusted where we want it, let’s go ahead and install the lateral locks to keep it in place. They are a simple 2 piece “clamp” style lock. Take the bolts out, place it tight against the inside of the respective side of the sway bar, then place the other side on, thread the bolts on and tighten them down.

We went with the middle setting on the rear as well. We wanted to set the car up as balanced as we could to get some baseline runs in and see if we want to adjust them later.

That’s it! It was a little bit of a chore of course, as you would expect installing something that is so important to the handling and suspension of your car. We are going to take the car out for some runs and get some hard data and share it as soon as it is done. Thanks for taking time to read this long write up and we hope it helps you guys make the decision to purchase some aftermarket sway bars. Don’t let the install scare you. They are reasonably difficult, but definitely do-able. Thanks for reading!!

-Corby

How-To: Install Whiteline Front and Rear Control Arm Bushings on 2003+ Mitsubishi EVO 8/9/X

You can purchase these bushings directly from us HERE

In this how-to, we will be installing the Whiteline control arm bushings, on the front and the rear. The ones on the front were a lot easier than the rear. But they were both relatively easy, just time consuming.
Getting started, the first thing we needed to do was collect the necessary tools to perform this task. There was one special tool we needed for this install and it was the press tool kit. So, let’s get a list of tools you will need.

1) Ratchet
2) Sockets: 14mm, 17mm, 19mm
3) Wrenches 14mm, 17mm, 19mm
4) Jack, or car lift
5) Jack stands (if on the floor)

Now, we have all of our tools, should we get started on this fun filled project? I think so. We will need to remove the parts outlined in the image below; the front section can be left on the car for this install. You won’t have to remove the entire under tray, just these parts to gain access to the bolts and nuts.

There are a few 10mm bolts holding these but mostly there are plastic clips that require either a flat tip screwdriv

Now we can get to the bolts that hold the lower control arm in place. You will have one in the rear position it bolts straight up into the chassis and it’s a 19mm there is a nut on the other end of it and you’ll have to put a 19mm wrench on there to keep it from spinning. You can take it all the way out.

Next there is one in the front of the car, It’s also a 19 mm and you’ll have to pull the plastic cover out of the way to gain access to it. Simple enough, once you get to it, just zip it out and take it out of the car.

Take the bolt/nut out of the spindle to lower control arm. It’s a 17mm bolt with a nut on the back side, get your wrench on the back side before you loosen it. Then just pull it right out.

Take the bolt out of the end link and the LCA should be ready to pull out. You might have to wiggle it back and forth just a little bit, but it should pull out with little effort.

In order for us to get the existing bushings out we will need a ball joint press tool kit. We went down to the local AutoZone and bought this kit from them. It is available as a “tool to rent” if you just needed to use it this once and bring it back. If you do that you get your 100 bucks back

With the arm off the vehicle, we can remove the stock bushings. We need to get the rubber washers off the

We just need to separate them with the #2 press adaptor. It’s a little tricky to get in there because of the shape of the arm itself. It’s doable, just tricky. We used an air impact to drive the press shaft into the bushing to push it out of the arm like this

Once we have the old bushings out, we can slide the new ones in, first; however, we need to throw some grease in the bushing to avoid abnormal wear on the bushing.

Since they are greased up, we can slide them in place; they should fit tight, but go in with a little bit of effort.

This being a two piece bushing you will have to put once half in one side and the other half on the other side.

Now we slide the sleeve in through the whole assembly. You can do this by hand, be sure to push it all the way through.

While putting the arm in, you will want to slip the rear of the arm in first, then you can push the front part we just replaced the bushing in

Now we can reinstall the arm. Word of caution; make sure you get the cut out on the stud lined up with the hole so you don’t destroy your bolt as you slide it in.

Push the arm up and slide the stud back in place and throw your bolt through (it should slide in easily) Then thread your nut on and tighten it down.

Put your end link back on and thread the nut on and tighten it down.

Ok, so that’s it for the fronts, let’s move on to the rear. The rears are a little more difficult considering their location. They are up top on the forward part of the upper control arm. Here’s a picture of the bushings we will be replacing.

To get to these bushings, we will need to remove the upper control arm. To do this, we ultimately need to remove these three bolts.

Take the 17mm bolt/nut off the spindle to control arm. There is a nut and a bolt here so you will have to use a wrench and a ratchet with socket.

Next pull the rear most 19mm bolt out from just in front of the rear sway bar.

Now the award winning tough to get to bolt! This one took the most time out of all of the bolts in this install. The proximity of the bolt to the fuel lines, fuel tank, and basically everything else you can think of made this pretty difficult to get out. We ended up having to run a very long extension up from the front of the car to the head of the bolt.

This is the angle we took to get to the bolt; this is looking back from just in front of the driver’s side wheel well behind the fuel tank. It’s tricky, but doable. Be patient.

Then pull the end link from the sway bar.

To make room for the control arm to slide out, we had to loosen the coil over and pull it out of its slot and slide it out of the way.

Now that we have the arm out of the car, let’s bring it over to the work bench and get that bushing out We’ll have to pull the same rubber washer/spacers out as we did on the fronts

These bushings pushed out nice and easy. Just use the #2 press tool and the c-clamp and press it right out.

Then we replace these bushing just like the fronts (don’t forget to grease the sleeve)

And slide the metal sleeve in

Now we can put everything back together and call this thing DONE!!
Slide the arm in place and bolt it right back up then reassemble all of it. It seemed to help to have a jack on the brake assembly to help hold it in place while we slid it into the spindle up top.

Then reassemble the strut assembly.

When we get all of this stuff together, we can stand back and look at how much we have accomplished!

Here’s the assembly all back together and ready for some track time!

It’s time to celebrate all of our hard work and take our evo out to the nearest track and test these new parts! We will have updates on the performance enhancements of these parts soon, with a video or two, keep an eye on these threads! Thanks for reading our write ups and we hope they all help you guys when you install your own items.

-Corby

How-To: Install Whiteline Roll Center Kit on 2003+ Mitsubishi EVO 8/9/X

You can purchase this roll center kit directly from us HERE

In this how-to, we will be installing the Whiteline front roll center kit. I had done this once before on a 2013 Subaru BRZ so I was somewhat prepared for what to expect.
This install is pretty easy, and straight forward, it does take a special tool, a ball joint press kit.

Getting started, the first thing we needed to do was collect the necessary tools to perform this task. So, let’s get a list of tools you will need.

1) Ratchet
2) Sockets: 14mm, 17mm, 19mm
3) Wrenches 14mm, 17mm, 19mm
4) Jack, or car lift
5) Jack stands (if on the floor)

Now, we have all of our tools, should we get started on this fun filled project? I think so. We will need to remove the parts outlined in the image below; the front section can be left on the car for this install. You won’t have to remove the entire under tray, just these parts to gain access to the bolts and nuts.

There are a few 10mm bolts holding these but mostly there are plastic clips that require either a flat tip screwdriver like the one pictured below, or a Phillips screwdriver that you just back out a half turn.

Here’s a shot of what comes in the kit when you pull it out of the package:

Now we can get to the bolts that hold the lower control arm in place. You will have one in the rear position it bolts straight up into the chassis and it’s a 19mm there is a nut on the other end of it and you’ll have to put a 19mm wrench on there to keep it from spinning. You can take it all the way out.

Next there is one in the front of the car, It’s also a 19 mm and you’ll have to pull the plastic cover out of the way to gain access to it. Simple enough, once you get to it, just zip it out and take it out of the car.

Take the bolt/nut out of the spindle to lower control arm. It’s a 17mm bolt with a nut on the back side, get your wrench on the back side before you loosen it. Then just pull it right out.

Take the bolt out of the end link and the LCA should be ready to pull out. You might have to wiggle it back and forth just a little bit, but it should pull out with little effort.

Since we have the LCA out, we can quickly throw the tie rod end on. As you loosen the lock nut on the factory tie rod end make sure you mark where the factory tie rod end was threaded to.

Thread the stock one off, then, thread the new Whiteline tie rod end in its place and tighten the lock nut down and push it up through the spindle and throw the nut on.

To get the stock ball joints out, you will have to press them out, either with a hydraulic press, or with a kit like we bought from AutoZone, here’s a picture with the part number of the kit we bought. This kit was 100 bucks, it might not have a ton of options in it, but it worked perfectly for this install.

First thing we did was get the stock black dust cover off of the ball joint. It was easy enough, all you have to do is get a flat tip screwdriver under the lip and pry it up and then pull it off. Careful there is a LOT of grease under there (thankfully) Once you get the cover off, you will want to clean the grease up and get access to the flat snap ring that holds the ball joint in place. These things are a little tricky to pull off. The best way I found to get it off was to take some snap ring pliers to spread them open just a little bit, and then slide a flat tip screwdriver under there to pry it off. Be patient it will come off. Don’t worry about destroying it; you’re replacing the whole thing anyway.

Here’s the tool we used to press the stock one out. It came out relatively easily, after it broke the initial hold on the ball joint, it came right out.

When pressing in the new Whiteline ball joint, you want to make sure it’s fully seated in the sleeve. It has to go in there quite a ways, you can see in this picture how far it has to go in. if you don’t get it fully seated, you will never get the snap ring on.

Once you get it fully seated, you have to put the dust cover on. Easiest way we found to get it on all the way was to take the #3 press tool and tap it on with a hammer, make sure you get it fully seated.

Now we can reinstall the arm. Word of caution; make sure you get the cut out on the stud lined up with the hole so you don’t destroy your bolt as you slide it in.

Push the arm up and slide the stud back in place and throw your bolt through (it should slide in easily) Then thread your nut on and tighten it down.

Put your end link back on and thread the nut on and tighten it down.

That’s it! Here’s a shot of the tie rod end with the ball joint in the background, looks good!

This install didn’t take that long at all. Here’s a little blurb about the kit “Roll Center Kit incorporates 2 steering arm tie rod ends and 2 ball joints and is designed to raise front roll-center geometry after lowering the vehicle and also improve on the original bump-steer geometry. Changing front suspension geometry by raising roll-center, results in substantial increase to roll resistance and significant reduction of suspension compression of outside front wheel during cornering through improved weight transfer distribution. Whilst bump steer correction via extended tie rods aids in minimizing steering angle input during suspension articulation. “

Thanks for reading this write up we hope it helps assist you in the installation of your own roll center kit!

-Corby

How-To: Install Whiteline Front Roll Center Kit on 2013+ Scion FR-S/Subaru BRZ

Purchase your Roll Center Adjustment Kit directly from us HERE

 
We took our employee’s 2013 BRZ out to the shop to install the Whiteline Front Roll Center Adjustment Kit for the 2013-2014 Scion FR-S and Subaru BRZ. So we looked online to find the installation instructions and decided we would make a fairly comprehensive write-up for you!

Going into this, pressing the ball joint out and back in seemed a little difficult, but once we got started, they pressed right out, and right back in. Guess that’s the beauty of having a new car to work on  . Before we get started let’s see what Whiteline has to say about this product:

Roll Center Kit incorporates 2 steering arm tie rod ends and 2 ball joints and is designed to raise front roll-center geometry after lowering the vehicle and also improve on the original bump-steer geometry. Changing front suspension geometry by raising roll-center, results in substantial increase to roll resistance and significant reduction of suspension compression of outside front wheel during cornering through improved weight transfer distribution. Whilst bump steer correction via extended tie rods aids in minimizing steering angle input during suspension articulation.
So we looked around the shop and found that the only thing we didn’t have was the press kit to press the ball joints out. So every other tool we needed was just laying around to make it easy on us. Here’s what we ended up using.

Keep in mind; you will have to get your car off the ground, securely on jack stands and front tires/wheels off the car to do this installation.

1) ½ in drive ratchet
2) Extensions
3) 17mm, 19mm sockets
4) Vice grips (for that pesky cotter pin removal)
5) Needle nosed pliers
6) Flat tip screw driver (small)
7) Drill with 10mm driver and 12mm driver (for removal of under tray)
8) Pickle fork
9) Hammer
10) Impact (not necessary, but makes things easier)
Here’s a picture of most of the tools we used. We didn’t use the pry bar, but it made it into the picture somehow.

Ok, now we’re getting somewhere. Since we didn’t have the press toll required to press out the bushings, we ran down to Autozone and grabbed one of these, it worked great!

Now that we have all of the necessary tools, let’s get started. First thing we need to take off is the under tray of the car to gain access to the bolts to take the lower control arm off. It’s simply 8 12mm bolts, 4 10mm bolts and 6 plastic clips and it comes right off. Be careful as it might just fall off when you get the last bolt loose.


To get the clips off, simply slide a small flat tip screwdriver in the head and pop it out and it should slide right out.


There are five nuts/bolts that need to come off to get the lower control arm out. Some are 19mm and some are 17mm you see which is which once you get started. Here’s a shot of the control arm from below that shows you roughly where they are.

Bend the cotter pin as such that it slides out from the hole.


Now take the castle nut off.

Now that the nut is loose, just tap the top of the ball joint being careful not to damage the threads, and it should pop right out.

Now we can move to the front of the car and undo the bolt and nut that holds the front/lower control arm bushing in place.

Pull the pin out of the ball joint that connects to the hub spindle.


Then, simply break the nut loose and thread it off.

Now take your pickle fork and spread the ball joint loose. This shouldn’t take a whole lot of effort.

Now we can move on to the rear bolt/nut. Just get a ratchet on one end and wrench on the other and it should come right out.

We loosened the tie rod end locking nut while it was still installed because it will be a lot easier to to it on the car, than trying to hold it while doing it off the car

We took our sharpie to mark the threads on the tie rod to make sure we got as close as we could to factory specifications when reinstalling the new tie rod ends.

Now that we have it loose, let’s go ahead and pull it out. The whole assembly is now ready to come out of the car.

Just wiggle it a little bit and it will come right out.

Then we threaded the tie rod ends off and grabbed out new Whiteline replacements! Man, they look good. You can definitely see the height difference from stock to these replacements. That’s what it’s all about!

Installation of these is extremely simple, just thread them back on the tie rod in place of the stockers keeping in mind the marks you made on your threads to line them up as close to factory specs as possible.


Phew, now the fun part begins

First thing you need to do before removing the factory ball joints is getting the dust boot off. Just take a flat tip screw driver and work your way around the boot prying upward and it will come off. There will be quite a bit of grease when you get it off, just wipe it off with a rag.

After that’s done, we can take the ball joint tool out of our press kit and press the old one out, we had the #2 sleeve on the bottom with the ball joint tool and the #3 sleeve on the top to press it out. It worked pretty slick. It seemed like it wasn’t going to work at first, but it slowly worked right out. Be patient here.

Now that we have the old one out of the way, let’s press the new one in. this is VERY simple; pull it through from the bottom like this

Now put the #2 sleeve on the bolt side and press it in straight on the ball joint itself. Be sure to press it all the way in, there shouldn’t be any gap

Here we are placing the assembly back onto the car. It seemed to be easiest to slide the forward most bushing in place first, and then slide the rear one in, then work on the ball joint into the spindle.

Line up the hole in the rear of the control arm and slide the bolt in and thread the nut. Don’t tighten it down just yet.

Take your front bolt/nut/plate and replace them in the front position, keep these loose as well (for now)

Then slide the ball joint into the hub assembly might be slightly tricky, but it will slide in.

Place the tie rod end in the rear of the spindle.

Thread on all respective nuts and tighten them to factory specifications.

You can replace the under tray and you’re ready to go! That wasn’t so bad, was it? Now you can enjoy the benefits of having the Front Roll Center Adjustment Kit installed! Get your car on the track and experience the difference this product makes in handling!

 

Thanks,

Corby

 

 

How-To: Install Air Lift Air Suspension on 2013+ Scion FR-S/Subaru BRZ

Purchase your Air Lift Suspension directly from us HERE

Approaching this install it seemed fairly intimidating at first, but once we got started and figured out where we were going to install everything, and route our air lines and wires, it all came together nicely.

Here’s what Air Lift has to say about the kit specific for the FR-S and BRZ:

Get the stance you want and the performance you need with Air Lift’s Performance air suspension kits! Every kit they offer is fully engineered to properly fit your vehicle, provide unmatched static drop, and deliver ride and handling capability that exceeds factory suspensions. No other lowering suspension provides a more versatile package for daily use.

Get your BRZ or FR-S down! With 4″ of drop and all the versatility of air, the Air Lift Performance kit is the best choice for show stance, daily driving AND track performance. Get the looks you crave with the performance you need!

The sleek V2 controller is protected in a rugged, rubberized coating to help protect against the occasional drops and scratches. Display readout shows, individual corner air pressure and tank pressure. You can select your pressures to be displayed in PSI, or for our friends across the pond, we now have an option for BAR!! To give you the ultimate in personalization of your system we have loaded the multi-color display with 512 color combinations! Believe it or not all of this technology fits in the palm of your hand and only takes one wire to connect to your wire harness.

Not only does the V2 give you 8 different presets to tailor to your ride heights needs, but it also “learns” your vehicle to provide incredible accuracy with every push of the button. As you roll low, the V2 will constantly monitor your pressures and adjust accordingly to your presets. V2 also allows you to control your system manually, for the ultimate in independent 4 corner adjustment. With the raise on start feature, you won’t even have to touch the controller! Fully laid out? Raise to your ride height as soon as you turn on your ride and you’re ready to go.

You want diagnostics? Well V2 has diagnostics! With a touch of a button you can check compressor performance and compressor run times. The system will also alert you to a leak, a low pressure situation, communication failure or if there is something wrong with your valve.

Installation could not be easier! Mount your components, hook up 3 wires, plug in the OEM quality harness and you are ready to go. The detailed instruction manual will take you through the calibration and ride height preset process. Each V2 is 100% function and leak tested at the factory after assembly, so you can cruise the streets in confidence!

Kit Features: 
Drop = 4″+
Durable double bellows springs
30-level damping adjustable monotube struts
Adjustable front camber plates
Anodized red aluminum accents
Powdercoated gloss black steel brackets
Braided stainless steel leader hoses
1/4″ & 3/8″ PTC fittings
All mounting hardware
Detailed instruction manual
AutoPilot V2 Digital Controller
1/4″ Air Line
Advanced Air Lift Manifold
Viair 380 Compressor
5 Gallon Powder Coated Steel Tank
Air Lift’s 1-year warranty and excellent customer support

To achieve full drop chassis modifications may be required to your car.

Now that we have a pretty good idea what to expect when it’s completed, let’s gather up the tools to get this thing installed:
1) Ratchets 3/8” and ½” drive
2) Sockets: 10mm, 12mm, 14mm, 17mm, 18mm, 19mm ,22mm
3) Wrenches: 10mm, 12mm, 14mm, 9/16, 5/8, 7/8, 17mm, 18mm, 19mm
4) Impact gun ½” drive
5) Dikes/pliers/needle nose pliers
6) Small flat tip screw driver, regular flat tip screw driver
7) Phillips screw driver

Ok, so we got together all the things we have to install on his car, keep in mind, there are more things here, than what come with the kit. We replaced the tank with a different one that he had previously on another car. So some of the pictures won’t quite match up with what you have to install.

Here are the boxes of goodies we had to install for the day. Only 3 of the boxes are the Air Lift kit.

Here’s a shot of most of what comes in the kit. Keep in mind, we used a different tank (read smaller), so our install photos will have a different tank.

Well now, let’s get to it. First thing, pull the rear spare tire cover out so we can get the spare tire out and see what we have to work with for mounting the tank.

Now let’s get these interior panels pulled out so we see what room we have to work with and where we can route the air lines and wires.

Take your flat tip screwdriver and pop the plastic clips loose and pull the rear plastic cover off.

Next we need to get the side panel carpet off. Just undo these clips and they will simply pull right out.

On the driver’s side panel you have the trunk release wiring clip you will want to undo before pulling it out, just squeeze the white clip and it pulls right out.

Now we spent a little time trying to figure out where to mount the tank/pump/controller assembly before we finally decided to mount it to the rear of the car with the pump and controller facing the front of the car. Some of these pictures might show it facing the other direction, but not to worry it was just us test fitting the tank.

Here we are fitting the pump and controller assembly to the mounts for the tank we installed. This is what we opted for, you can use whatever works for you in your specific installation.

You can see in this image how we routed the air line out of the pump and into the tank, this seemed to be the most feasible way to route it in our situation with the tank we used. You might find an easier/better solution if you use the tank that comes in the kit. You’ll notice on the right of the tank in this picture, we have the outlet going from the tank to the valve controller. There is a schematic that plainly and simply explains how to hook all the lines up to the valve body. You’ll want to hook the outlet of the tank to the slide lock fitting second from the right, as the right-most slide lock fitting is the exhaust for the system. On the bottom side, we routed the drain fitting with a Schrader valve at the end so we wouldn’t experience any leaks. All of this is clearly explained in the manual. All of the bung holes that are not going to be used will have to be plugged with the appropriate plug. (If using the tank that came with the kit, it comes with plugs that you can use. Don’t forget to use the supplied thread sealant when placing any fitting or plugs to avoid leaks!

Here we are placing some of the fittings to the pump, this is showing us threading in the air inlet filter barb.

We drilled through the floor to mount the tank/controller/pump assembly and mounted it with four bolts. It seems to be stable and didn’t create much vibration because of the vibration isolators in the pump mount.

Since we have the pump/controller/tank assembly mounted, now we need to start on the wiring. Power and ground from the controller harness connects straight to the pump with a simple two wire hookup. We opted for the butt connector route. You can solder/heat wrap if you choose, either way works. You can see in this image we had to snip off the provided ends off to get to the wires to butt them together.

Everything in this kit is clearly marked on the wire itself so it’s basically plug n play.

Next we routed the harness and the controller display to the front (controller we routed to the center console and drilled through the bottom of the tray and ran the wires through and left the display loose so we can move it around. We thought about mounting it on the dash, but it we thought it would be more versatile being loose.

Here we are routing the wiring harness towards the front of the car, we took the bolt out that holds the rear seat in place so we can have easy access to the routing location we chose.

Lift the seat up and you can see how we routed the harness through. There is a nice groove in the floor pan that the wires rested in perfectly. So we pulled them through there.

Then we had to pop the side panel off so we could tuck the wire through the side as to not have it showing throughout the car. It simply pops loose from the side of the car and it gives you access to pull the wire through

Pop the door sill off and that give you access to the under carpet routing for the wires. You’ll have to pull the rubber seal off the door jamb to pull it back and slip the harness through.

Here you can see the process of the wire routing. Fairly simple, just take your time to tuck them properly so they don’t leave lumps in the carpet. It should be seamless.

Under the hood, you can see here where we went through the firewall. To get through this you will need a fish tool of some sort. Just fish the tool down from under the hood, tape the wire to the fish, and pull it through.

Now, as we were passing the battery, we have to pull the power and ground wires out of the loom so we can hook them straight up to the battery with the provided loops. Just cut the tape on the loom to pull the wire out to the proper length then you will want to separate the ignition wire from the power/ground wires. Then route the ignition wire to the fuse box in the front passenger side of the engine bay.
You’ll want to do this as clean as possible so try to route the wires along the factory harness and keep it clean!

They give you a couple of fuse tap clips with this kit. We decided to utilize one for the sake of this write-up. They are easy enough to use, just make sure you use the side of the fuse that is before the fuse so you don’t over load the existing fuse. And also, be sure to use the provided fuse block in the kit. Slide the tap onto the fuse and press it back in the slot.

We used the lower most fuse, closest to the fender, located in the fuse box under the hood, we used this fuse because it has power while cranking but no power when the ignition is off. We had to drill a small hole to get the wire through the top of the box.

Now we can hook up the battery positive and ground. Be sure to utilize the fuse block on your positive wire. Use the provided loops to attach them to the battery terminals bolts.

Now that we have all the wiring done, let’s move onto the struts install! We did the rear first. Simple enough, three nuts hold the strut in place; take the top two off first:

Then, on to the lower bolts, this will differ a bit from your install because we installed Cusco rear lateral links. So we took all of these bolts out. It made removing the strut a breeze.

Now when you pull the rear lateral links off, the whole assembly will come with it including the strut, so be careful not to drop it!

The new struts are so much shorter prior to airing up the bag, you will have to jack the assembly up into place so you can thread the two top nuts on.

Next on the list, replacing the front struts. Should be simple enough, let’s get to it! Three nuts on the top strut mount.

We will be replacing the end links with the ones provided in the kit. You will want to completely remove the factory end link. You will have one nut up top and one on the bottom. The end links should come off with ease.

Get the brake line retainers off by removing the single bolt holding it to the strut. Also, remove the abs sensor wiring by pulling the two clips off of the strut as well.

Slide the new struts in place of the old ones and bolt them up (you will need to get an alignment asap after installing these as you would installing anything suspension related) Now we can start running our air lines. Use the provided stainless steel lines on the front struts. Thread them into the bag assembly on the rear of the strut. You will have to drill a hole into the fender well to get the hose to go safely through into the engine bay to meet up with the air lines we run up front.

Put this fitting on the end of the stainless line so you can hook the air line to it using the slide lock connector.

Now the provided end links should be pretty close to adjusted properly straight out of the box. Make sure they are close to the same length before you mount them. It’s easier to tighten the nuts on the end link after they are installed, do so after they are mounted up.

Back to the back! Now we can start feeding the air lines! This is exciting! This is a good time to have someone that can help you by feeding the lines down through the holes while you drag the lines and feed them to the appropriate corner. Make sure you’re marking the lines as you run them so you don’t forget which is which.

As we ran the lines under the car, we attached them to the fuel lines. We just zip tied the two that go up front to them. We tried to make the install as seamless and clean as possible. You can see the routing of our front passenger side air line here. It turned out really clean!

Now we have all four corners ran!

Let’s clean them up a bit. This car has existing rubber plugs in the spare tire well which makes this part easy. Just poke a hole through and shove the wires through and admire how clean it turns out!

The instructions that come with the kit have a nice, simple to follow schematic for hooking up the lines, so all you have to do is make sure you have the properly marked line, run them as cleanly as possible, cut them to length, and slide them in the appropriate push lock connection on the valve body controller.

Phew! That was fun wasn’t it?! Now we get to do the fun part, calibrating the system! Sit the car on the floor, and follow the instructions on how to calibrate it. It takes about 20 minutes to calibrate and the car will go up and down several times. You can see the rear down here:

And the front here. Keep in mind; we have not adjusted the heights yet, so the front is sitting a little higher than the rear. We didn’t have time to get it all set properly. But this kit will go LOW! The rear can come down a little more and the front can come down a LOT more.

All in all, I would say the install is very easy. I had never installed an air bag kit before and I was excited and nervous to try. The thing that took us the longest time was properly mounting the tank/pump/controller assembly. After that, it was cake! Total time for this install (keep in mind, we tried documenting as much as we could so that takes time) was around 8 hours. If you have installed these components before I could see you possibly cutting the install time in half. Good luck and enjoy the new, lower ride!

Thanks,

Corby

How-To: Install Whiteline Anti LIft Kit on 2013+ Scion FR-S/Subaru BRZ

Purchase your Anti LIft Kit directly from us HERE

We took our employee’s 2013 BRZ out to the shop to install the Whiteline Anti Lift Kit for the 2013-2014 Scion FR-S and Subaru BRZ. So we looked online to find the installation instructions and decided we would make a fairly comprehensive write-up for you!

Going into this, pressing the bushings out and back in seemed a little difficult, but once we got started, they pressed right out, and right back in. Guess that’s the beauty of having a new car to work on. Before we get started let’s see what Whiteline has to say about this product:

The Whiteline Anti Dive Kit is designed to add 0.5 deg static positive caster to both front wheels while changing the nature of front anti-dive & lift. These low compliance bushings also maintain higher dynamic positive caster & change the front control arm geometry that positively influences front suspension attitude. This leads to superior traction under power and braking, including cornering, dramatically reducing under steer & front wheel spin. The additional caster coupled with the new firmer bushings supplied serve to dramatically sharpen initial turn-in response then forcing more consistent alignment angles through the corner due to the reduced bushing compliance.

So we looked around the shop and found that the only thing we didn’t have was the press kit to press the bushings out. So every other tool we needed was just laying around to make it easy on us. Here’s what we ended up using.

Keep in mind; you will have to get your car off the ground, securely on jack stands and front tires/wheels off the car to do this installation.

1) ½ in drive ratchet
2) Extensions
3) 17mm, 19mm sockets
4) Vice grips (for that pesky cotter pin removal)
5) Needle nosed pliers
6) Flat tip screw driver (small)
7) Drill with 10mm driver and 12mm driver (for removal of under tray)
8) Pickle fork
9) Hammer
10) Impact (not necessary, but makes things easier)
Here’s a picture of most of the tools we used. We didn’t use the pry bar, but it made it into the picture somehow.

Ok, now we’re getting somewhere. Since we didn’t have the press toll required to press out the bushings, we ran down to AutoZone and grabbed one of these, it worked great!


Now that we have all of the necessary tools, let’s get started. First thing we need to take off is the under tray of the car to gain access to the bolts to take the lower control arm. It’s simply 8 12mm bolts, 4 10mm bolts and 6 plastic clips and it comes right off. Be careful as it might just fall off when you get the last bolt loose.


To get the clips off, simply slide a small flat tip screwdriver in the head and pop it out and it should slide right out.


There are five nuts/bolts that need to come off to get the lower control arm out. Some are 19mm and some are 17mm you see which is which once you get started. Here’s a shot of the control arm from below that shows you roughly where they are.

Bend the cotter pin as such that it slides out from the hole.


Now take the castle nut off.

Now that the nut is loose, just tap the top of the ball joint being careful not to damage the threads, and it should pop right out.

Now we can move to the front of the car and undo the bolt and nut that holds the front/lower control arm bushing in place (this is the one we are replacing)

Pull the pin out of the ball joint that connect to the hub spindle.

Then, simply break the nut loose and thread it off.

Now take your pickle fork and spread the ball joint loose. This shouldn’t take a whole lot of effort.

Now we can move on to the rear bolt/nut. Just get a ratchet on one end and wrench on the other and it should come right out.

Now that we have it loose, let’s go ahead and pull it out. The whole assembly is now ready to come out of the car.

Just wiggle it a little bit and it will come right out.


Phew, now the fun part begins

Take the whole arm assembly over to the press (or use the tool in the kit) and get that factory bushing out! You will want to press it out with the arm upside down, and press the new one in with the control arm right ride up. We used the #1 and #2 press sleeves for this process. Here’s how we had it lined up, with the #1 on the bottom and #2 on the top.

We found out that the bushing would only press out around 3mm then we had to press right on the bushing itself (the soft part) it seemed sketchy at first but it started moving and popped right out.

Next we pressed the new bushing in. when we first attempted to get it to go in, it almost immediately so we adjusted the approach and it seemed to work perfectly.

You can see here how we ended up pressing it in. It might look dangerous, but it worked perfectly.


Now press it all the way so the lip is fully seated against the control arm.

Now we need to lube up the bushing so we can slide the sleeve in.

Also, lube up the two outer bushings as well.

We can slide the sleeve into the bushing now. Just approach it at an angle and work it in and it should slide in with little effort.

Push the outer bushings onto the sleeve.

There you have it, now the arm is ready to install back onto the car.

Here we are placing the assembly back onto the car. It seemed to be easiest to slide the forward most bushing in place first, then slide the rear on in, then work on the ball joint into the spindle.

Line up the hole in the rear of the control arm and slide the bolt in and thread the nut. Don’t tighten it down just yet.

Take your front bolt/nut/plate and replace them in the front position, keep these loose as well (for now)

Then slide the ball joint into the hub assembly might be slightly tricky, but it will slide in.

Place the tie rod end in the rear of the spindle.

Thread on all respective nuts and tighten them to factory specifications.

You can replace the under tray and you’re ready to go! That wasn’t so bad, was it? Now you can enjoy the benefits of having the anti-lift kit installed! Get your car on the track and experience the difference this product makes in handling!

Thanks,

Corby

How-To: Install Whiteline Rear Adjustable Toe Arms on 2013+ Scion FR-S/Subaru BRZ

Purchase your Adjustable Toe Arms directly from us HERE

 

While we were installing our rear lateral links and air bags on the 2013 Subaru BRZ, we wanted to install the Whiteline Rear Adjustable Toe Arms while we were at it.. These install in just a few minutes and take very minimal tools. So let’s take a look at what Whiteline has to say about them:
Whiteline Rear lower Lateral Toe Adjustment Turnbuckle arm allows for a more precise adjustment of toe on the rear suspension over the stock units. When installing coil overs and lowering the car, sometimes the OEM rear toe adjustment is not enough to put it back to reasonable spec. Where the Whiteline unit comes in, is that it allows for a wider range of adjustment. These units include a harder polyurethane rubber on the in-bore side, which has much less flex compared to the stock units. This gives you better feedback, and less flex allowing for more precise feedback. They also feature a motor sports outer ball joint, which helps to cope with stress that is exerted on these components when exposed to hard use.

This kit also includes the toe lock kit which allows you to lock in the toe settings on the car.
Now, we just have to get the tools together to get this thing replaced. Should be easy enough.
1) Hammer
2) 17mm, 19mm 7/8”wrenches
3) Ratchet or impact
4) 19mm socket
5) Pliers

Let’s get started! First things first, let’s get the car up and secure on some jack stands and get the rear tires/wheels off. Now we have access to the bolts/nuts that hold the factory tow arms in place. Pull the clip out of the stud so we can get the outer nuts off. Take your wrench and break it loose, then it should thread off.

Now take the inner bolt/nut off and pull the inner bushing out of the sleeve. You just have to tap the top of the bolt of the ball joint a few times and it will fall out of place:

Remove the factory arm, take it over to your Whiteline replacements and compare the two. You want to make sure that these are as close to the same length as possible till you take the car down to have an alignment done. Now slide the Whiteline unit in place.

Now we need to lube up the bushings on the inner part of the arm with the provided lube. Once you have it all lubed up, slide it in place

Now we can put our bolts and nuts in place and tighten them to factory specifications. Don’t forget to put the pin in the castle nut to reduce the possibility of the nut working loose!

Tighten up your adjustment lock nuts and that’s it! You’re ready to go. Now that you have your tow adjusters, you can go as low as you want without worrying about abnormal tire wear due to an incorrect tow setting. Now that was simple, and a well worthwhile mod for anyone looking to adjust their car out of factory specs due to adjustments beyond factory ride height or wheel fitment. Enjoy! Thanks for reading!

 

-Corby

How-To: Install Cusco Rear Lateral Links on 2013 Scion FR-S/Subaru BRZ

Purchase these Rear Lateral Links directly from us HERE

 

We were installing the Air Lift Performance Air Suspension Digital Combo Kit on one of our employee’s 2013 Subaru BRZ and he bought a few other goodies to install while we had it apart. So here we have a simple how to installing the Cusco Rear Lateral Links for the Scion FR-S and Subaru BRZ. These were a breeze to install and they take just the most basic of tools.
Here’s what Cusco has to say about them:
Cusco’s adjustable pillow ball lateral links helps control unwanted force under acceleration and braking. They are designed to secure traction in drifting and stability during acceleration under high speed cornering. We love them due to the camber adjustments that should have come on this car from the factory!

Sounds great to us! So let’s get the tools together to get this job done!

1) Ratchet ½” drive
2) 19mm, 14mm, 17mm sockets
3) 17mm, 14mm wrenches
4) Hammer (not necessary, but you might need it to tap the bolts out)

This install is very easy. It’s simply 4 bolts/nuts after you pull your rear wheels off. So, get your car up on jack stands securely, or use a lift like we did, and pull your rear tires/wheels off. Now that we have that done, you can see here the four bolts/nuts we have to remove to get the stock rear lateral links off. Take the three 17mm nuts loose, then the 14mm nut and tap the bolts out. Be careful, the lateral link will fall right out when you get these loose.

Now place the stock lateral link next to the Cusco link and make sure they are the same length, try to get them as close to exact as you can. Tighten up the adjustments on the arm and place it where you took the factory one out. Slide the bolts in all four holes and make sure everything is tightened to factory specifications. Don’t forget to use the bolt and nut that came with the link or you’ll find that one nut won’t thread onto the bolt quite enough.

You can see the bolt here that they provide in the kit.

That’s it! Wasn’t that easy? Now, put your tires/wheels back on, sit your car on the ground and go for a drive. You might not feel the difference right away, but when you start driving your car spiritedly, and take it to the track, that’s when you’ll appreciate your purchase. Thanks for reading!

Corby

How-To: Install Turbosmart Internal Wastegate Actuator on 2013-2014 Ford Focus ST

Purchase this IWGA directly from us HERE

We recently installed the Turbosmart Internal Wastegate Actuator on our White Sheep Focus ST! We talked to Turbosmart a little bit while we were in California about the benefits of running this new wastegate actuator and they told us that the benefits are, faster spool time, more consistent boost delivery and more accurate boost control. So we thought it would be a great add-on for the ST! 

Here’s what Turbosmart has to say about it:

The ST Internal Wastegate Actuator (IWG) provides better turbo response and greater sensitivity when managing boost pressures. Designed as a direct bolt-on replacement for the factory part, the ST IWG is easy to install and requires no special tools or fabrication. It can’t get any easier!

Tuning may be required with this actuator.

So after receiving it, we decided it was time to get it installed and see what it was all about. We’re glad we did, it turns out that the first batch was mis-shipped and we received a batch that had the incorrect brackets. We had to slightly modify ours to get it to fit, we notified Turbosmart and they were on the ball and quickly shipped out the correct product for us! Thanks Turbosmart! The only difference between the one we installed and the new ones we received is the bracket holes were off by approximately 2mm. The new ones are fixed and ready to install.

So, this seems like it would be a tough install, something that would take a very long time to accomplish. When we approached the install we gave ourselves around 5 hours thinking that it might take that long. All in all, it was about 2 hours start to finish, and this includes drilling out our “incorrect” bracket which you won’t have to worry about. I would say the most difficult part was getting the bolts that hold the actuator to the turbo off and back on, only because we kept approaching them at the wrong angle and the socket wouldn’t go on straight.

So the tools we used on this install are:

1) Ratchets
2) Extensions, long and short
3) T30 torx bit (for under tray)
4) 10 mm, 8 mm sockets
5) 10 mm, 8 mm wrenches
6) Needle nose pliers, or standard pliers (to take the vacuum line off)
7) Flat tip screw driver

Ok, so now that we have gathered those up, let’s get started. We need to get the car in the air first, so we can access things. You can use a jack and jack stands, we used a lift.

Now that the car is in there air, we need to pull off the under tray. 11 t-30 torx bit screws takes care of that

Now that we have that out of the way, we need to pull the heat shield off the turbo so we can get to the wastegate actuator. Pretty simple, two bolts and its off!
This is the lower one

Then there is an upper one as well. You will want to use plenty of wd40 or pb blast to help get these out. They are a little tight caused by the many heat cycles of the turbo. This isn’t a very good image, but there is a bolt there.

Now that we have that out of the way, we have pretty good access to the wastegate actuator. There is little room between the firewall and the actuator, so some of these pics are bad, and I couldn’t get a very good picture of the nuts on the arm. Here’s the wastegate bolts from one angle.

Now that we have that out of the way, we have pretty good access to the wastegate actuator. There is little room between the firewall and the actuator, so some of these pics are bad, and I couldn’t get a very good picture of the nuts on the arm. Here’s the wastegate bolts from one angle.

We tried to get to the bolts from this angle and it wasn’t a very good approach, so we went up top, pulled the intake off and cover off the engine and gave us pretty decent access to it from up top. As you can see here

We pulled the retaining clip off of the actuator arm first, but we really couldn’t get a camera back there to get a decent picture of it, there is a little clip that retains the bolts from coming loose that comes off simply by prying it gently with a flat tip screw driver. Watch that you don’t fling it off and lose it because you will be using it on the new arm. Once you get that clip off, just loosen the outside nut and thread it off the arm completely so you can slide the arm out of the wastegate arm. Now we can take our socket and ratchet with a long extension to get back there and take the actuator off.

Now that you have it loose, you’ll want to pull the vacuum line off the barb on the top of the actuator. Take a pair of needle nose pliers, squeeze the clamp to open it and slide it back, and then gently pull the hose off. Now the actuator is free and should pull right out. Slide it straight back out of the wastegate arm and pull it out. Now that we have it out, I can clearly show you the nuts on the arm. Here is the stock actuator next to the Turbosmart unit. The quality of the Turbosmart unit is amazing!

Now that we have them side by side, let’s adjust the nut on the Turbosmart unit to match the factory one. Be careful here, when we first adjusted it, we had it a little too tight and when we took it for a test drive it was holding too much boost so we had to back the nut off slightly to get it within factory specs.

Now simply place the new Turbosmart actuator back in the factory location and bolt it down and replace the vacuum line. Don’t forget to put that retainer clip over the 2 nuts on the actuator arm.
Here’s a shot of it in it new home. Ready to hold some boost!

All that’s left is to put everything back together and you’re ready to go. Take your car for a test drive and make sure you’re within boost targets for your respective tune, and you’re ready to go. Now enjoy your new found boost stability and quicker spool time!

Thank You,

Corby

How-To: Install Hella Supertone Horns on 2013-2014 Ford Focus ST

You can purchase these horns directly from us HERE

We have been planning to install these horns on the White Sheep for a while now; things kept getting in the way. We finally got some time to get them installed and wanted to share the install with you guys! We know that the factory horns are fairly loud so we were unsure exactly how much of an advantage we would see by installing these horns. I’ve got to say though, WOW these things are LOUD! We did a little dB meter testing with an android phone so it was in no way scientific at all, but we found an 11db difference from 20 ft. away. While this might not seem like a whole lot, being that it’s 20 feet away, it is a VERY noticeable difference. Here’s a picture of the location of the phone, how we kept it in place, and the readings we found.

Well, let’s see what tools are necessary to install these. This all depends on how you want to install them; you could very well do it with leaving the front bumper on by pulling the lower covers off the car and reaching up into the passenger front section where the horns are located, shown here:

We pulled the front bumper off with plans to install them in another location, but once we started messing around with different placement, we found that the factory location is the best place for them. So, while the front bumper is pulled off in the pictures, just think of the install with the bumper installed. It would have been a LOT less time consuming if we wouldn’t have pulled it off.  Tools needed when installing with the bumper in place will be:

1) T30 Torx
2) 10mm
3) Wire strippers/crimpers
4) Wire
5) Bolt/nut to couple the brackets together
6) Electrical tape
7) 4 female blade connectors
8) 2 spade connectors
9) Heat wrap (for wires)

Now that we have everything gathered up, let’s get started. Get the car in the air and secured either on jack stands, or on a lift. Pull the lower front lip off (3 T30 torx screws) then the belly pan (8 T30 torx screws) and finally, the front lower cover (7 T30 Torx screws and 4 push clips) Now that we have everything apart, let work on pulling the factory horns out. This will be very easy, just a single 10mm bolt and a wiring clip (just squeeze the clip and it pulls right off) Here’s our resident ratchet man, pulling the bolt out. You can see the clip hanging down, there is also a Christmas tree clip holding the wiring harness to the bracket, it should push right out.

Now that we have the bracket out, let’s take it to the vice, and drill the holes out to fit the larger bolts on the back of the Hella horns. We used a 21/64 bit, but a 3/8 would work just as well.

Here we are drilling out one of the holes and test fitting it, perfect fit!

Now drill out the other side, and there you have it, a bracket, ready to accept the Hellas!

So we wanted the horns to have a nice, square, symmetrical look to them when they were installed, if you just use the bracket by itself, it’s impossible to do, it places the horns to close together and you would need to bend the bracket to get them to fit. So, we took on of the brackets that came with the horns and did some test fitting.

We found the best location for it and found a bolt to couple them together (the kit does not come with bolts; it only comes with the nut on the back of the horn on the stud.

This seems to be the best way to install the bracket and keep everything nice and even and symmetrical.

Here we are test fitting to make sure they will look properly, both horns are loose at this point. But you can see, they are just about perfectly placed.

Now, for the wiring. This is pretty easy, all we did was take some female blade connectors and put them on the horn’s connectors. Now we found that there are no markings for the positive and negative on these horns, so we made sure we used the same side connector and spliced them together. So, we took some spade connectors, cut one side off and this seemed to work great to reuse the factory connector without having to cut the end off. In case we decided to put the stock horns back on.

Now that they are all wired up, we just need to hook them up to the factory connector, these spade connectors work great for sliding into the factory receptacle. They just push in, nice and snug, we used electrical tape to tape them up to the connector to help keep them in place and to reduce the possibility of a ground out.

Here are some placement shots along with some clearance shots so you can get an idea of how they fit.

Now that we have them installed, blast those things! Man, they are really loud. When we were testing the wiring, we hit the horn while standing right in front of them, boy that was a mistake. It about made us deaf. If you were having issues with the volume of your existing horns, these are a great way to increase the volume without breaking you wallet. There is a video of these in another person’s thread so we didn’t post a video, if you would like us to post a different video, let us know and we’ll get one up. Thanks for reading, and enjoy your new, loud horns!

Corby